I’m Not Harmonious

If you’ve traveled in China, you’ve likely heard about the Harmonious Society (“和谐社会”). It serves as the ultimate goal for the ruling Communist Party of China (CCP) along with Xiaokang society, which aims for a balanced middle-class oriented society, as first proposed under the Hu administration during the 2005 National People’s Congress.

The communist party’s dominant socio-economic vision defines policy around economic development, tax policy, and social conventions. In practice, vocal differences of opinion are considered misguided and citizens should place the “collective” over the individual. Diverging opinion with the popular party position are a sort of political apocrypha. That is, those parts of China which fall in line with the popular party position are patriotic and hence pro-China. This implies of course that some areas are somehow less pro-China.

Now I have a confession to make. This post, in fact, is not about China. This post is in fact a big mind-f**k.

Try re-reading second paragraph after replacing “China” with “America”, and “communist party” with “GOP”.

This is what went through my mind when I read Sarah Palin‘s “Pro-America areas” quip she made during a North Carolina rally. Apparently she feels 32 million of us living in California are apparently not pro-American. This kind of verbal detritus is just one example of why so many of us have left the Republican party. We’re rooting for the country, not a political machine our founding fathers warned us about.

I’m not suggesting the GOP is as repressive as the CCP nor am I suggesting some sort of equivalency. I am however suggesting that the GOP is taking a page out of the one-party system’s playbook. And that’s something you should find unsettling…… if you are pro-American.

Update: Ironically, some Republicans are running away from their own party in some parts of the country, going so far as to change ballots to “Grand Old Party”. Original photo here.

Photo from Aidennag on Flickr

Photo from Aidennag on Flickr

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This entry was published on October 20, 2008 at 1:10 AM. It’s filed under Uncategorized and tagged . Bookmark the permalink. Follow any comments here with the RSS feed for this post.

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